The research by Danish scientists show the benefits of low-carbohydrate diet for diabetics

Copenhagen scientists have found that abidance by a low-carbohydrate diet reduces the general level of insulin by 22%.

“Maintenance of a normal state of health in type 2 diabetes primarily does not depend on drugs, but on proper nutrition and lifestyle changes,” – a well-known statement which the team of researchers from the University of Copenhagen wanted to prove.

According to them, the replacement of pasta, bread, and potatoes with high protein products (meat, eggs) can significantly improve blood sugar level in people with type 2 diabetes.

To confirm their hypothesis, the researchers collected 16 people with type 2 diabetes, aged 43 to 70 years (middle age 65 years). After that, the participants were divided into two groups and transferred one of them to a high-carbohydrate, and the other – to a low-carbohydrate diet. Also, for the purity of the experiment, scientists canceled the consumption of sugar-lowering drugs (for example, metformin) for both groups.

According to the study, the second group of patients reduced energy consumption from carbohydrates from 29% to 16% and increased energy consumption from proteins from 31% to 54%.

Despite the lower amount of “carbohydrate” energy, the patients did not feel a lack of food. On the contrary, they reported that a low-carbohydrate diet helped overcome the feeling of hunger between meals and reduce the number of snacks.

The research results are complemented with the evidence that intaking low carbohydrate food can improve general well-being to people with type 2 diabetes.

So Copenhagen researchers found that those, who followed a high-protein diet, lowered the level of glucose after eating by 18%, and reduced general insulin by 22% compared to those who supported the high-carbohydrate diet.

They also found that the levels of the other two hormones involved in the metabolism – glucose-dependent insulin-tropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide 1 – increased by 35% and 17%.

The researchers say that it is necessary to do more work to explore the effects of eating a high-protein diet on diabetes for an extended period.

The researchers say that it is necessary to do more work to explore the effects of eating a high-protein diet on diabetes for an extended period.